entrepreneurship, Finance, Personal Leadership

From #SideHustle to #PassiveIncome!

 

Anyone who’s known me for any length of time knows that I don’t believe in having just one source of income. If you’re new to the concept, I recommend this article I wrote about why you should have a side hustle.

Before my editorial services business became my main gig, it was my side hustle. When it became my primary source of income, I knew I needed another side hustle.

I had one for a while, and it was a truly fun and lucrative one, but amongst other drawbacks there was the “hustle” part of it.

I needed something less intrusive, something closer to my everyday life, a way to get paid for doing things I already did every day, things that came naturally to me.

After reading The Four-Year Career (a life-changing book for me!) I knew for sure that what I wanted was out there, and that I would recognize it when I saw it.

And I have!

I recently partnered with an amazing company that allows me to build residual income by doing what I’ve already been doing daily for free.

I’m excited and fired up!

 

PS

There’s a lot out there under the guise of business opportunities offering extra income. Here’s something I learnt from a great leader:

 

ABOUT YOUR OPPORTUNITY

  1. Is this a real business opportunity? Or just an excuse to move money amongst friends?

If the answer is NO, don’t WALK away… RUN away!

 

  1. Would I purchase the product or service if there were NO Business opportunity attached?

If the answer is NO, don’t WALK away… RUN away!

 

  1. Does the company offer a leadership development program?

If the answer is NO, don’t WALK away… RUN away!

 

 

Pinpoint Creatives

Why Do You Need an Editor When You Have Spell Check?

Are you counting on tools on your computer to identify errors in your document? Spell check and grammar check have limited uses. There are certain errors that they just cannot pick up; I see this happen all the time.

Semantic errors are not things your computer can fix for you.

For example, “discrete” and “discreet” are both proper English words but not used in the same way. Spell check won’t help you there.

It is wrong to say “I asked her severally” when you mean “I asked her several times” but your computer can’t tell you, because “severally” is also a word- used differently.

Don’t risk turning your readers off. Ensure that your work is memorable for all the right reasons. I’m at your service! #YouNeedAnEditor

Interview

21 Questions for Joy Ehonwa, Writer and Editor

I’m always interviewing people; it was nice being on the other side this time 🙂

I shared about how I started my writing and editing career, life in the freelance world, what I’ve learnt along the way, and more, in this interview with Afoma Umesi. Enjoy!

Literature

If You’ve Ever Dreamed of Publishing a Book, Read This

 

Naija Single Girl, whose novel, 29, Single and Nigerian, I edited in 2015, wrote a detailed blog post about the entire writing process.

Although she mentioned me in it, I just found it today and I’m sharing because I love the way she frankly outlined her journey, from the first day she wrote down a word, to writing 500 words a day, then 1000, and so on. She also talked about her search for an editor who would preserve the Nigerian English that makes the book what it is, getting a good cover design, and finding an affordable publisher.

It’s a good read for anyone who intends to write and publish their book. Click HERE to read it, and remember to share!

Interview, Published Articles

Career of the Week – Uche Okonkwo, Managing Editor

Uche Okonkwo’s first degree is a B.A. in Education/English from the University of Port Harcourt. After NYSC, she did a bit of volunteering, and then returned to Kachifo Limited, where she had briefly interned earlier. In 2012 she went back to school to study for an MA in Creative Writing at University of Manchester. In 2014, she returned to Kachifo, where she is now managing editor. We chatted about career decisions and the most important skills & qualities an aspiring editor should cultivate HERE.

#COTW

 

Interview, Published Articles

Career of the Week – Damilola Oyedele, Senior Product Manager in Training

Damilola Oyedele is in the third and final year of a double master’s program in Business Administration and Public Policy (MBA/ MPP) at the University of Chicago, after which she will be joining a tech company as Senior Product Manager. She got her BSc in Economics from Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile Ife. We talked about career decisions, role models, and advice for undergraduates HERE.

Inspiration, Published Articles

What’s Keeping You from Writing Your Book?

As an editor, writer and ghostwriter, I tend to attract people who dream of authoring books on a daily basis. When we get to discussing the reasons why their dream is not yet reality, there are certain explanations that keep recurring.

If you’re someone who wants to write a book but has never gotten round to it, decide here and now that 2017 will be the year you produce your manuscript. The time to start preparing is now, and here are a few things you should keep in mind. Continue reading…

Relationships

Letter to Dee

Dearest Dee,

It’s been a while. We don’t talk as often as we used to, and yet nothing has changed; not my admiration of your femininity, poise, wisdom, grace, eloquence and uncommon kindness, not your inexplicable fondness for and devotion to me, and certainly not our ability to talk about any and everything – when we do get to talk.

I remember the girl that I was when I first arrived Lagos. When I think of her, and then look at the woman I am today, two words flash before my eyes; God…Dee.

In May 2007 I left my little job in Warri after many months of longing for a better life. I remember walking home from work one day and, in a moment of intense awareness of the sheer ordinariness and tedium of my existence, muttering a quiet but heartfelt prayer: “God, please let me be somebody in this life.” So the next time my friend in Lagos raised the issue of relocating, I said yes without knowing how it would come about.

It turned out that saying yes to myself – yes to my potential, yes to my greatness, yes to more – was enough.

On the 4th of September 2007 I showed up ready to begin a career in Public Relations. I was prepared for work, but I was not prepared for you, Dee. When I first set eyes on you that first day at work, I had no way of knowing how much you would come to mean to me. It still amazes me how quickly we took to each other, even now that I can clearly see it was meant to be. What would a senior colleague, 11 years older than I for that matter, stand to benefit from a relationship with me?

I did not understand it at the time, but I do now. It was through your eyes that I truly saw myself for the first time. It was you who made me aware of my personal brand. My ability to look at a document and spot errors – from typos and grammatical blunders, to double spaces between words – was something I took for granted.

“It’s not about knowing English, Joy. I have a good command of the English Language myself; I was a broadcaster for almost a decade, FRCN trained. It’s the combination of language proficiency AND attention to detail. Don’t take it for granted. My husband’s company would benefit greatly from having someone like you.”

You influenced everyone in the office with your opinion of me. It wasn’t long before the MD insisted that no document leave the office without having been checked by me. You praised me publicly and corrected me privately. You gave me books and magazines to read. You gave me clothes, shoes and jewellery. You shared life experiences with me. And if that was all you did, it would have been enough.

Perhaps the most interesting thing about our relationship is the fact that you did not need that job. Oh, everybody who worked there knew that; we all realized from the car you came to work in, the clothes you wore, and the trips to South Africa and Paris for medical checkups, that you were not there for the money; but it was only later in our friendship that I would realize just how much you did not need the money.

You also did not need to keep in touch with me after you resigned to go start a family. You were no longer my boss, and even though I still wanted to be friends with you, it was your call, really. And you chose to be my friend. You chose to drive from the Island to the mainland just to take me out for starch and banga soup. You took my calls and counselled me when the need arose. When it became necessary for me to leave that office, you recommended me for a role in your husband’s company.

The pride you took in me as I grew in my new job meant almost as much as the fat pay check. You made sure to tell me all the wonderful things your husband said about my intelligence, dedication and readiness to learn new things. “He believes you can do more than research. He says he’s discussed with the Consultant to train you as a scriptwriter.” By believing in me you gave me more than a job, Dee; you gave me a sense of worth, a new career, the opportunity to learn new skills and a lifelong mentor who taught me how to write documentary scripts, and more.

You saw my gifts when I couldn’t see them, and you did your best to open my eyes to my own value. I look at my life, count my blessings, and count you 10 times.

There’s no way I could possibly recount all the things you’ve given me and done for me, and all the opportunities I have had because of you. Neither is there any way I could ever pay you back. Still, when I remember the girl I was when I first arrived Lagos, and look at the woman I am now, I purpose in my heart that I will pay. I have made a commitment to be to someone what you have been to me, God willing. I will pay it forward.

 

Love,

Joy.

Interview, Literature, Published Articles

5 Minutes With Tunde Leye, Author, Guardians Of The Seal

Sunday 25th September 2016, writer and blogger Tunde Leye launched his novel, Guardians of the Seal, and social media has been abuzz since.

I interviewed him for Connect Nigeria’s “5 Minutes With…” and I think every aspiring writer can learn a thing or two. Continue reading…